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Buy less, choose well

Date: May 13, 2015 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

Location: Nottingham Conference Centre, Nottingham Trent University, Burton Street, Nottingham NG1 4BU

Contact: marketing@sdc.org.uk

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    ‘Buy less, choose well.  Make it last.  Quality not quantity’.  (Vivienne Westwood).

    SDC in partnership with Nottingham Trent University. Incorporating the UK final of SDC’s prestigious International Design Competition 2015.

    Fast changing trends and consumer pressure for cheap prices can result in poor design and production quality.  Environmental concerns continue to grow.  However quality design and production can be achieved at all levels of the market is we are creative with materials and processes. How do we create something we can cherish for years to come?   The day will have a strong emphasis on sustainability. This event brings together the UK fashion and textile industry, students and tutors.

    Morning session

    Please click on the ‘speakers’ tab for more detailed information about the presentations.

    In the morning we plan to include sessions on dye machine developments, process control electronics and dye developments. Speakers include:

    • John Easton, Ecology Solutions Manager, DyStar – Chemical management in global supply chains
    • Juergen Brockmann, Managing Director Sales, Thies – Latest developments in yarn and fabric dyeing machinery
    • Peter Needle, Managing Director, Segura Systems – Supply chain transparency – a little technology goes a long way
    • Roy Stones, Global Marketing Director, Color Root Technology Co Ltd – Getting more from less

    Afternoon session

    In the afternoon we will look at the designer’s role in sustainability and how to survive and thrive in today’s market. Speakers include:

    • Jane Middleton-Smith, John Smedley Ltd – John Smedley: Design to last a lifetime
    • Neil Lant, Research Fellow, Procter and Gamble – Buy less, choose well…look after them
    • Fern Kelly, Director of Design, Camira – Camira had a little lamb – Blazer and other sustainable stories
    • Sarah Kettley, Senior Lecturer, Nottingham Trent University – The electric corset and other future histories

    The afternoon ends with a networking drinks reception.

    How much does it cost and how to book

    You can choose to attend for the morning, afternoon or full day.  The full day rate includes lunch.

    SDC members £65 full day / £35 half day

    Non members £85 full date / £50 half day

    Student members £25 full day / £15 half day

    Student non members £30 full day / £20 half day

    To book your place, register your interest, or if you have any questions, please email: marketing@sdc.org.uk.

    Reserve your place now

    • Members of ASBCI/OCCA/SCI/Bradford and Huddersfield Textile societies can also take advantage of the SDC Membership discount; just select one of the Member options below.
     

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  • John Easton, Ecology Solutions Manager, DyStar
    Chemical management in the global supply chain

    Clothing retailers are increasingly  concerned about the health and environmental impact of dyes and chemicals used in the manufacture of their garments. This has partly been triggered by regulations such as REACH in the EU but also by NGO activity such as the Greenpeace Detox campaign which targeted high profile fashion and sportswear brands. A new paradigm is emerging where companies are collaborating to improve performance of chemical management in their supply chains as evidenced by the formation of the Sustainable Apparel Coalition and the Zero Discharge of Hazardous Chemicals (ZDHC) group. John Easton of DyStar will describe the latest developments.

    Juergen Brockmann, Managing Director Sales, Thies
    Latest developments in yarn and fabric dyeing machinery

    Thies gmbh & co founded in 1892 produces discontinuous yarn and fabric dyeing machines. Thies is still today a family owned business in its 5th generation. Until a few years ago labour costs have been most important for the manufacturing industry in textiles. Nowadays costs for energy are at least as important and their focus today is to produce machines and systems which consume significantly reduced energy. Also processing times are under observation and equally important for a cost effective production of textiles.

    Peter Needle, Managing Director, Segura Systems
    Supply Chain Transparency: A little technology goes a long way.

    Fashion retailers are increasingly turning to technology to take their business to the next level. Virtual changing rooms and interactive websites use the latest technologies to improve the customer experience, but the most important innovations are found behind the scenes, within the garment supply chain. Software technologies can transform sourcing, production and retail processes, and help to achieve the fashion retailer’s Holy Grail – supply chain transparency.

    Roy Stones, Global Marketing Director, Color Root Technology Co Ltd
    Getting more from less

    Textile Processing is more than ever a cost focused industry. Retailers put pressure on dyeing mills to produce fabrics faster, with higher quality, environmental compliance and with a lower price. It is no longer possible to offer dyes and chemicals based on price and technical service. It is essential to provide “total service” which includes certification and even cost saving logistical / inventory concerns. I will propose a concept of using a small range of dyes to cover multiple processes therefore reducing inventory / logistic costs and at the same time maintaining top class quality.

    Neil Lant, Research Fellow, Procter and Gamble
    Buy less, choose well… look after them

    Consumers are suffering from ‘first wash anxiety’ with deep concerns about new garments losing their integrity during laundering. And it’s no wonder why – we’ve all encountered problems like mechanical damage, poor print integrity, shrinkage, dye fading, greying of whites and encrustation. These issues lead to many items ending up at the back of the wardrobe, and consumers being frustrated about poor return on their investment in clothing. Is buying better quality garments the solution? It’s certainly part of the solution, but the way in which consumers care for the clothes is also critically important. The choice of laundry products and washing conditions leads to enormous differences in fabric integrity and the detergent industry is developing new technology and products which break the ‘cleaning versus care’ paradigm by enabling increased stain removal with better fabric integrity and improved sustainability as an added bonus. We hope that this will help consumers protect their investment in quality clothing, and encourage more designers to create more machine-washable rather than dry clean only fashion.

    Fern Kelly, Director of Design, Camira
    Camira had a little lamb – Blazer and other sustainable stories

    Camira are an award winning textile innovator specialising in contract upholstery fabrics for commercial interiors and mass passenger transportation. Recognised for product innovation and environmental best practice, sustainability is at the forefront with all product developments. This talk will give an introduction to Camira’s environmental fabrics, which include recycled raw materials and renewable fibres. These fabrics are marketed under the trademarked ‘Second Nature’ brand. A particular focus will be on ‘Blazer’, a woven felted best-selling fabric. We will follow its’ sustainable route of production, from the lambs back in NZ through to the seat covers in universities and banks throughout the country.

    Jane Middleton-Smith, Archivist, John Smedley Ltd
    John Smedley: Design to last a lifetime

    John Smedley has for over two hundred years, made innovative, contemporary knitwear of the highest quality. From design to manufacture, the company combines traditional techniques with the latest technology in order to produce luxurious, hand-finished garments. The core brand values of Colour, Design, Quality and British Craftsmanship will all be explored in order to underline why John Smedley pieces are a true investment, designed to last a lifetime.

    Kath Townsend, Reader in Fashion and Textile Crafts in the School of Art and Design, Sarah Kettley, Senior Lecturer, and Sarah Walker, Postgraduate Research Student, Nottingham Trent University
    The electric corset and other future histories

    This presentation will discuss the preliminary outcomes of an ongoing collaborative research project between three researchers from Nottingham Trent University, and Judith Edgar, curator of the historic costume and textiles collection held at Newstead Abbey. The project aims to demonstrate the wealth of historical artifacts and references available to designers of fashion, smart/textiles and wearable technologies, through explorations into archival material and using creative experimentation to inform concepts for design longevity in synthesis with wearable technologies.

     

Society of Dyers and Colourists

Perkin House, 82 Grattan Road, Bradford, West Yorkshire, BD1 2LU, United Kingdom
Tel: +44 (0)1274 725138, Email: info@sdc.org.uk
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